Category Archives: News

June’s Student News & Voices

Blastoff!: A rocket built by students has reached space for the first time. Ten students from the University of Southern California’s Rocket Propulsion Lab recently won the race to breach the Kármán line, named for the Hungarian-American engineer who attempted to define a boundary between Earth’s atmosphere and space. Find out how they did it.

Quack, Quack, Zoom?: The ‘Flying V’ is usually associated with migrating water fowl and inspirational hockey formations. But what about a revolutionary new airplane shape? Students and researchers at TU Delft came up with a new plane design that will drastically cut fuel consumption and make for a more comfortable passenger ride while keeping existing air travel infrastructure. Read more here.

Go Baby Go: High school and college STEM students in Connecticut are teaming up to build free go-carts for low-income disabled children. These carts serve as fun adaptive wheelchairs for the kids. Read more here.

Tampa Topics: ASEE’s Annual Conference is upon us! From June 16-19 in Tampa, Fla., engineering educators from around the world will discuss pressing problems of the day. The Student Division is exceptionally active, with 17 sessions touching on such wide-ranging topics as “counterfactual thinking,” the Girl Scouts, and experiences in Qatar and Vietnam. The ASEE Students Facebook group often has links to hotel room shares and ride shares for cheap conference travels. Find out more here.

Helping Hand

Disabled workers are only as limited as their workplace accommodations. Leave it to engineering students to find innovative ways to help them help others! NYSID hosted the 2019 CREATE Symposium on April 10, showing off ways that nine different schools helped accommodate workers with varying disabilities, awarding $30,000 total to the top three entrants. Watch videos from the winning entries and see how you can participate in next year’s competition! Find it here.

Low-Income Lowdown

Inequality is rife in elite universities-not just in the admission process but also in the support given to low-income students. Anthony Abraham Jack was recently at the American Academy of Arts and Sciences to celebrate the release of his new book: a case study of how elite institutions like the one where he teaches, Harvard, fail low-income students. The subject matter is intimately familiar to him. Can he help change it? Read here.