Category Archives: ASEE

Student Spotlight

Infant jaundice, a liver condition characterized by yellow skin and eyes and sluggishness, is easily treated in developed countries. In countries that lack resources, however, the condition can be fatal. Students at Texas Engineering World Health, a student organization led by Alina Schroeder, have come up with a low-cost treatment: a blue-light incubator called Bili Lights. Read more here.

Tinker Toys

As a busy engineering student, you probably don’t have all the time in the world to take on side projects–even though these types of projects can help you better grasp material and help you find your passion in the field (not to mention put you ahead of some other students in internship applications). Click through to find some small side projects you can tinker with in your dorm in your spare time, courtesy of Make: magazine. Even better, see if you can’t improve on some of the designs!

Continue reading Tinker Toys

De-constructive Criticism

Constructive criticism is a great way to learn and grow in your field–be it in the form of grades, performance reviews, or difficult conversations. Yes, it can be awkward and hard to swallow, but many times it’s something you need to hear. If you can learn to take it gracefully and implement it into your life, in the long run, it builds you up. Destructive criticism, however, tears you down. It’s “being critical of others in a demeaning, unconstructive way or seeking to control others’ behavior through intimidation.” Whether at school or in the workplace, it’s a terrible abuse of power. Inside Higher Ed has a great article on how to deal with it. If you can do it well, you may go far–or at least save your sanity. Read it here.

NASA Student Launch Competition

Vanderbilt took first place for the fourth time in five years.

The NASA Student Launch is an annual competition that challenges student teams from middle school through graduate school to propose, design, build and test a reusable rocket that flies to 1 mile in altitude, deploys a recovery system and returns safely to the ground, while carrying a payload of scientific or engineering value. “The Vanderbilt Aerospace Design Lab team from Vanderbilt University claims top honors. Vanderbilt’s first-place finish is the team’s fourth win in the last five years.” Read more here.
(Note: If you’re interested in participating, the 2019 Student Launch Handbook will be available in late August 2018.)
Pictured at top: Oregon State University claimed Rookie Award honors and took sixth place overall. All images courtesy of NASA.