Category Archives: Advice

The Magic Email

Keeping students motivated during the semester can be a challenge when the going gets tough and the realities of an engineering education set in, and midterms and finals come around. But one email from you, the TA, AI, or professor, can help keep students in the pipeline. The Chronicle of Higher Education talks about how. Read it here.

Prism magazine also has useful coverage on how to use this technique to keep students engaged. Read Mary Lord’s article here.

Job Searching with Disabilities

Job searching is especially fraught if you fall into a protected class. People who are disabled (or differently-abled) must, on top of an already difficult process, contend with discrimination, a system where resources are not easy to come by, and rampant misinformation about what is legal and what isn’t. Find a few resources for job searching below:

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Job Interview Questions

Ah, the job interview. You’ve put on your best suit, your best smile, and answered all of their questions with poise. But when the interviewer asks, “Do you have any questions for me?” all of the sudden, your mind goes blank. A surprising number of candidates don’t have questions, or simply use the time to try to further pitch themselves for the job. This is crazy—after all, this is a job that you’re considering spending 40 or more hours at a week. You should have questions! At The Cut, they have listed out some questions that you might find valuable in deciding if the job is right for you–after all, you’re interviewing them right back! Find them here.

De-constructive Criticism

Constructive criticism is a great way to learn and grow in your field–be it in the form of grades, performance reviews, or difficult conversations. Yes, it can be awkward and hard to swallow, but many times it’s something you need to hear. If you can learn to take it gracefully and implement it into your life, in the long run, it builds you up. Destructive criticism, however, tears you down. It’s “being critical of others in a demeaning, unconstructive way or seeking to control others’ behavior through intimidation.” Whether at school or in the workplace, it’s a terrible abuse of power. Inside Higher Ed has a great article on how to deal with it. If you can do it well, you may go far–or at least save your sanity. Read it here.