All posts by edtemp

Cal Poly Team Wins Vehicle Safety Contest

Mechanical engineering students from Cal Poly took first place for their collision-avoidance technology at the Enhanced Safety of Vehicles (ESV) International Collegiate Student Safety Technology Design Competition held in Seoul, Korea.

According to a university press release, Ian Painter and Elliot Carlson, both seniors, and Thomas Stevens, a graduate student, developed a tenth-scale vehicle prototype that uses a light detection and ranging (LIDAR) sensor to aid a driver in last-minute maneuvers around a crash obstacle.

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Boston University Engineering Student Makes Forbes ’30 Under 30′ List

After discovering a therapy to eliminate bacteria, one Boston University Ph.D candidate became the envy of many scientists in his field.  Twenty-six-year-old Kyle Allison entered his simple and inexpensive therapy for persistent infections into the Invent Now Collegiate Inventors Competition in November 2011 and won the $15,000 first place prize, nabbing the attention of Forbes magazine in the process.

Honored in the graduate category, Allison’s research landed him a place on the Forbes “30 Under 30” science and innovation list. The special online edition was released last month.  Making the list came as a surprise to Allison.  “In the sciences people have definitely not done their most important work by the time they are 30, but they have made headway,” says Allison.

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Survive and Thrive: Sharnika Glasby’s Story

Special feature by Terrance Hamm

Sharnika Glasby’s childhood in troubled Southeast Washington D.C. included custody battles and a mother on drugs. But that didn’t stop her from reaching the honor roll and becoming active in the Model United Nations, choir, volleyball, and track. One of those students who “squeezed every moment out of high school,” in the words of a local radio correspondent, Glasby was headed for graduation at the top of her class and planned to pursue engineering at Penn State. Then life handed her one more challenge.  She calls it “the incident.”

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An Old-time Milk Route Model Delivers Life-Saving Technology

Students’ quest to provide medical aid veers away from high tech.

When four Johns Hopkins biomedical engineering students looked for a way to deliver medical oxygen in the developing world, they had in mind a device of their own design that could work well in a small public clinic.

But their search for the right gizmo took a surprising turn. And the solution they came up with — modeled on the milkmen of yesteryear – is no less innovative for being low-tech.

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Student Highlights for the 2013 ASEE Conference

From workshops to panels, the popular “tricks of the trade” sessions, and some great social events, myriad sessions at the annual conference should grab the interests of student members. Here are a few from the first two days of meetings:

A range of in-depth workshops are offered on Sunday, including one on MOOCs and the online revolution ($30 registration), the free Cyber tools for fast feedback workshop, and another free one on exploring the emerging taxonomy for engineering education research.

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