Category Archives: ASEE

Woodrow Wilson Fellowships

Teaching Fellowships

The Woodrow Wilson Teaching Fellowship seeks to attract talented, committed individuals with backgrounds in the STEM fields—science, technology, engineering, and mathematics—into teaching in high-need secondary schools in Georgia, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, and New Jersey. Eligible applicants include current undergraduates, recent college graduates, midcareer professionals, and retirees who have majored in, or had careers in, STEM fields.

The Fellowship also works to change the way top teachers are prepared, partnering with colleges and universities that have agreed to provide Fellows with innovative, year-long classroom experiences, rigorous academic work, and ongoing mentoring.

Dissertation Grants

The MMUF Dissertation Grants are available to graduate students who participated in the Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowship Program. The grants provide graduate students at the critical juncture of completing their graduate degrees with support to spend a year finishing the writing of the dissertation.

Fellowships for Teachers of Color

The goal of the Woodrow Wilson-Rockefeller Brothers Fund (WW-RBF) Fellowships for Aspiring Teachers of Color is to help recruit, support, and retain individuals of color as K-12 public school teachers in the United States.

Australian Students Claim Speed Record for Electric Vehicles

A team of UNSW engineering students has been officially recognised as the new world record holders for the fastest electric vehicle over a distance of 500 kilometres.

The Fédération Internationale de l’Automobile (FIA), world motorsport’s governing body, updated its official record with the new mark of 106.966 kilometres an hour set by team Sunswift in July (pdf). The previous record of 73 kilometres an hour stood for 26 years.

“It’s not often you can confidently say you made history before you even graduated,” Sunswift’s project director and third-year engineering student Hayden Smith said.

Sunswift is Australia’s top solar car racing team. Its current vehicle eVe is the fifth to be built and raced since the team was founded in 1996.

More than 100 undergraduate students contributed to Sunswift’s successful world record attempt over the past two years.

“If there is one thing we’ve learned, it’s that you’re never too young to make an impact,” Smith said.

UNSW Engineering Dean Professor Graham Davies congratulated the students for what he called “another exceptional feat”.

Earlier versions of the Sunswift car have been used to set a world record for the fastest solar powered road trip from Perth to Sydney, and a Guinness World Record for the fastest solar car.

“For a student project to achieve a new world record for electric vehicle speed and endurance is truly remarkable,” Professor Davies said.

“It goes to show what exceptional students we have here at UNSW.”

With the world record now official, the team is set to embark on its next major challenge – modifying the eVe to meet Australian road registration requirements.

“eVe will now be taken off the road for a few months to begin the transformation,” Smith said, adding that the car could be registered and on city streets within a year.

“We’ve always wanted to keep pushing the cultural change towards electric vehicles, and this is another big step in that direction.”

Source: UNSW

Shortage of Petroleum Engineering Faculty

For Colorado School of Mines petroleum engineering professor Carrie McClelland, teaching a  seminar of 45 students seems like a bit of relief. Normally her class sizes are closer to 80 or 90.

“It makes it difficult to make sure that they’re still getting a great education,” she said.

Enrollment in petroleum engineering at the school of mines, and at similar programs around the country has risen dramatically in the last five years in response to the nation’s energy boom.

http://wyomingpublicmedia.org/post/inside-energy-oil-engineering-boom-plenty-students-not-enough-teachers